Putting a Label on Artistry

by Jahzeel Dionne V. Ybasco

When can a person tell himself he is good at a particular art?

Or is the better question, “When can a person call himself an artist?”

Lastly, when can a person assume that he can instruct others how to produce art?

These questions have bugged me since last weekend when I read a former classmate’s tweet regarding her love for writing. It is such a petty thing, I know, but something in the message fired up a cold coal in the crevices of my heart, reminding me of old rivalry. How can she easily tell people what to do?

Some people have made it their responsibility to teach everyone who cares to listen or read how to create art, or what to love about it. However, isn’t it a waste of time and energy getting tips from someone who has not even produced any masterpiece? This is a faulty argument though, as I have learned. One of my students kindly explained it to me: Basketball coaches aren’t exactly the best basketball players out there. Even renowned basketball players prove to be unable to guide inept ones. However, wouldn’t it be nicer to get actual tips from real writers though? Or if they are willing to share their strategies to people like us? Or if they have the guts to finally call themselves writers.

I have gone past writing about Writing. I have already said enough. Although, I still have a love and hate relationship with it, I can no longer talk about when I started to love it. Why tell people how you have come to adore it? Is it really necessary? Don’t they say that actions speak louder than words? If so, what better way to express my ardor than using writing and actually produce art?

Despite being able to publish my own work, I still hesitate calling myself a full-pledged writer. I do blogs. I have published a novel. I write articles. However, I cannot put a label on what I do. Isn’t it enough to just love Writing and do it? After all, celebrated writers out there have spent their time laboring on their masterpieces. They spent their time writing, not learning nor instructing others how.

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